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Entries Tagged as 'political art'

Art with a Sense of Place - Part Two

February 11th, 2019 · Comments

Art with a Sense of Place considers creative projects that respond to a physical space and those that react to or embrace a historic moment, a cultural environment, a socio-political tension, or a psychological space.

Emerging in the 1960s, site-specific art sought to transcend what was perceived as the over-curated, almost clinical context of the art museum. Artists rebelled by creating their own exhibition sites (Agnes Denes brought a Wheatfield to a New York City landfill). Some flaunted the rules of museum installation with live interventions (Joseph Beuys lived in a Soho gallery with a live coyote).

Our series of episodes on site sensitivity brings a broader range of cultural production into the conversation, exposing new ways of seeing place, space, and site in contemporary art.

Art with a Sense of Place, Part II, highlights conversations featured in the second issue of the Fresh Art International Smart Guide. We produce the guide as a series of downloadable pdfs. Each issue delves into a different theme—through select episodes, transcriptions and links to research that informs our podcast.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio

Related episodes: Agustina Woodgate, Louis Grachos, Adam Schreiber, Tania Bruguera

Related link: Smart Guide, Issue 02 Art with a Sense of Place

Tags: · · · · · · · · · · · · contemporary art · artist residency · public art · photography · activism · performance art · environment · performance · community · political art · exhibition

Where Art Meets Sand and Social Behavior

October 29th, 2018 · Comments

What does it mean to make art collectively? How does art speak to our shared destiny? Where does sand intersect with art and community?

In the studio at Jolt Radio, with Miami-based curators and artists, we speak of art at the intersection of sand, smells and social behavior. Curator Quinn Harrelson and artist Troy Simmons introduce Collectivity, a site-specific exhibition at the Bakehouse Art Complex that explores the power of the individual and the collective. Curator Marie Vickles and artist Geovanna Gonzalez talk about the role of destiny and poetry in the exhibition Visions of the Future at Little Haiti Cultural Complex. Artist Misael Soto, the first-ever Art in Public Life resident for the City of Miami Beach, explains how he's curating and activating Sand, just steps from the shore in Collins Park.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Sound: Domingo Castillo, Tropical Malaise, Martin Jackson, It's really very easy, Misael Soto, Flood Relief 

Related Episodes: 2018 Creative Time Summit in MiamiArt and the Rising SeaCultural Complexity in Little HaitiWhere Art Meets ActivismWhere Art Meets Cultural History

Related Links: Bakehouse Art ComplexLittle Haiti Cultural ComplexSand, ArtCenter/South FloridaThe Bass Museum of ArtCreative Time

Tags: · · · · · · · · · · · · · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · film · public art · activism · curator · environment · community · political art · architecture · exhibition

Creative Time Summit 2018 to Explore Miami Culture

October 22nd, 2018 · Comments

Creative Time, the force behind ambitious public art projects in New York City and beyond, takes its annual summit to Miami in 2018. We invite Creative Time director Justine Ludwig to talk about the focus of this year's convening.

On Archipelagos and Other Imaginaries—Collective Strategies to Inhabit the World is the poetic title and subject of the 2018 Summit, with the idea of coalition as a central theme. Thinkers, dreamers and doers working at the intersection of art and politics gather to consider issues ranging from immigration and borders to climate realities, notions of intersectional justice, gentrification and tourism as an enabler for neocolonialism.

A portal to the Caribbean, Latin America and the entire world, Miami is the perfect context for such conversations. The City's creative community is ready—not only to share local challenges and their own site-sensitive initiatives, but also to welcome fresh perspectives on how art and activism might address these global concerns.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Audio: Krudas Cubensi, Mi cuerpo es mio, Haus of Shame via Amal KioskBrigada Puerta de TierraNástio Mosquito, Hilário

Related Episodes: Cultural Complexity in Little HaitiArt and the Rising SeaThe BLCK Family of MiamiModern Portrait of Black FloridaDiaspora Vibe: Art with Caribbean RootsCaribbean Arts Remix MiamiTania Bruguera on Art ActivismCesar Cornejo on Architectural InterventionMary Mattingly on Human RelationshipsGlexis Novoa on Cuba's PastLive from Dominican Republic with Tilting AxisLive from Trinidad: Where Digital Culture ThrivesPublic Art and the UnderlineArtist Residency in the EvergladesArt and the Environment at Deering Estates

Related Links: Creative TimeCreative Time Summit 2018Miami-Dade County Art in Public PlacesJohn S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Creative Time Summit Miami is co-presented with Art in Public Places of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, with leading support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Tags: · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · film · public art · activism · performance art · curator · black culture · black art · community · political art

The Art of Breaking the Bank

October 8th, 2018 · Comments

In the world today, many consider capitalism a fraught economic system. Some believe that capitalism is the cause current international trade wars, accelerating student debt, the bankruptcy of entire countries, the growth of virtual currencies and the reason for coded security systems.

Artist Hilary Powell and filmmaker Dan Edelstyn, an inventive couple based in London, have decided to wreak a bit of havoc with the capitalist system in their home country by opening their own bank. Hoe Street Central Bank, AKA HSCB, is open in the former Co-Op Bank on Hoe Street in the London suburb of Walthamstow.

Powell and Edelstyn have been printing their own bank notes and selling them to buy up debt in their community. This fall, they begin producing and selling bonds—a new initiative in the orchestration of their collectively owned and distributed debt explosion. The Optimistic Foundation demonstrates what Powell refers to as pessimism of the intellect, but optimism of the will. In the collective act of abolishing local debt, they're staging a timely intervention in the name of economic justice.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Sound: Bank Job/Optimistic Foundation

Related Episodes: The Art of CapitalismOccupy Museums on Artists and Debt

Related Links: Bank JobOptimistic Foundation

Tags: · · · · · · · Fresh Talk · film · public art · activism · community · political art

Process, Experimentation and Action in Dak’Art 2018

September 10th, 2018 · Comments

In 2018, seventy-five artists from thirty-three countries came together for the contemporary African art biennial known as Dak’Art. The offsite program featured more than 200 autonomous artist-organized exhibitions and events across Dakar and on the island of Gorée.

The projects we share in this episode explore ideas of freedom and responsibility as they investigate colonial histories, politics, and the economy, migration and the environment. Often achieved collectively and always emphasizing process, experimentation and action, they animate the legacy of legendary Senegalese artist Joe Ouakam and Agit'Art, the revolutionary creative movement he co-founded in 1974.

Voices: Simon Njami, Glenda León, Guy Woueté, Marcos Lora Read, Magdi Mostafa, Tori Wraånes, Marisol Rodriguez, Moataz Nasreldin, Pascal Traoré, Michel Amadou Gué

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio

Related Episodes: Magdi Mostafa Turns Analog Tech into Sound SculptureLIVE from Dak'Art 2018SITElines, Unsettled Landscapes 2014

Related Links: Dak'Art 2018Simon NjamiGlenda LeónGuy WouetéMarcos Lora ReadMagdi MostafaTori WrånesMarisol RodriguezZAM ZAMMoataz NasreldinDARB1718Issa SambAgit'ArtPascal TraoréIsland of Gorée

Tags: · · · · · · · · · · · · · contemporary art · art biennial · sound art · curator · community · political art · exhibition · art tech

Black in America

September 3rd, 2018 · Comments

What does it mean to be Black in 21st century America? The expression of Blackness in art has a history of intricate connections to civil rights and social movements. In the United States and abroad, painting and drawing, filmmaking and photography, performance and protest have long represented diverse creative perspectives on the volatile subject of race and identity in this country.

Today, we hear from curators and artists whose work directly engages with race and American identity. Individually and collectively, they generate “freestyle” expressions of Blackness—revealing that no matter how history influences the Black cultural space, identity remains a fluid form in the hands of contemporary artists.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Photos courtesy of featured artists and the Renaissance Society

Featured Audio: Thelma Golden at Crystal Bridges Museum of American ArtHamza Walker, Black Is, Black Ain't Symposium, Renaissance SocietyJohanne Rahaman field recordings in South FloridaTheaster Gates at Katzen Arts Center, American UniversityTheaster Gates performs at Huguenot House in Kassel, Germany, for documenta 13Sanford Biggers, BAM (For Michael)Fahamu Pecou, All that Glitters Ain't GoalsAmy Sherald at Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago 

Related Episodes: Modern Black Portrait of FloridaJefferson Pinder on Symbols of Power and StruggleTheaster Gates on Meaning, Making and ReconciliationSanford Biggers on Time and the Human ConditionAmy Sherald on New Racial NarrativesFahamu Pecou on Art x Hip-Hop

Related links: Thelma GoldenStudio Museum of HarlemFreestyleHamza WalkerBlack Is, Black Ain'tJohanne RahamanJefferson PinderTheaster GatesSanford BiggersAmy SheraldFahamu PecouDeborah Roberts

Tags: · · · · · · · · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · public art · activism · performance art · curator · black culture · black masculinity · black art · community · political art · exhibition

The Art of Capitalism

August 6th, 2018 · Comments

Today, capitalism, aka the free market, is linked to trade wars, suffocating student debt, entire countries gone bankrupt, burgeoning virtual currencies and coded security systems. What role can art and artists play in this wildly unbalanced economy? In abandoned bank buildings, failed urban development projects and public squares, we discover artists and their communities in the U.S., Western Europe, South America and Greece, taking on the challenge—as whistle blowers, catalysts, educators, money makers, evangelicals and documentarians.  

Featured in this episode: Occupy Museums/Imani Jacqueline Brown, Kenneth Pietrobono, Noah Fisher; Fictilis/Andrea Steves and Timothy Furstnau; Museum des Kapitalismus/Julian and Janosz; Musée du Capitalisme/Samuel Hus and Chloé Villain; La Torre de David/José Luis Blondet, Ángela Bonadies and Juan José Olavarría; Bank Job/Hilary Powell and Dan Edelstyn; Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Sound: Ángela Bonadies and Juan José Olavarría; Bank Job; Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir; Contributing Producer: Anamnesis Audio for Reverend Billy Segment

Related Episodes: Art and the Rising Sea; Art Sparking Social Engagement; Where Art Meets Activism; Art of the Everyday; Occupy Museums on Artists and Debt Related Links: Occupy Museums; Museum of Capitalism: Fictilis; Museum des Kapitalismus; Musée du Capitalisme; Bank Job; Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir; SITE Santa Fe SITElines: Casa tomada

Tags: · · · · · · · Fresh Talk · public art · activism · curator · community · political art

Samson Young Presents Hong Kong Mixtape

July 23rd, 2018 · Comments

Hong Kong Mixtape introduces our first guest producer: composer and artist Samson Young, and the sound art community of Southeastern China. Young orients us to a set of nine compositions with sonic program notes.

Hong Kong—a vibrant, densely populated urban center, a major port and a global financial hub—offers rich source material. Artist composers take us to the heart of student-led street protests during Hong Kong’s 2014 Umbrella Movement*, invite us to feel the vibrations of traffic lights and trams, immerse us in a traditional funeral ceremony and share the sensation of abstract computer-generated hip-hop. 

Samson Young’s personal field recordings capture site-specific sounds far from Hong Kong—the singsong of a North Carolina tobacco auctioneer and a peacock clock inside the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

The set of short compositions will be broadcast on radio stations in Canada, the U.S. and the U.K., and released as a podcast episode on multiple internet platforms, including Fresh Art International.

Sound artist composers and their works, in order of appearance:

Joyce Tang: Gloucester Road; Larry Shuen, Gynopedi No 1 Remix; Austin Yip, Philosophy One–Microsecond; Edwin Lo, Rabbit Travelogue: Central Region (Excerpt); Lee Cheng, Tram Ride on Sunday Afternoon; Alex Yiu, Alter ego (stereo mix); Samson Young, Tobacco Song and Peacock Clock; Fiona Lee, Tide

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Audio Sources noted above | Images courtesy Contemporary Musiking Hong Kong 

Related Episodes: Samson Young on Songs for Disaster ReliefEvery Time A Ear Di SounStephen Vitiello on Sound Art

Related Links: Contemporary Musiking Hong KongSamson YoungUmbrella Movement

*More on Hong Kong's Umbrella Movement of 2014, rephrased from The Guardian : Hong Kong's so-called “umbrella revolution” turned the city’s gleaming central business district into a virtual conflict zone, replete with shouting mobs, police in riot gear, and clouds of tear gas. Tens of thousands of Hong Kong residents – young and old, rich and poor – peacefully occupied major thoroughfares across the city, shuttering businesses and bringing traffic to a halt. They claimed that Beijing reneged on an agreement to grant them open elections by 2017, and demand “true universal suffrage.” 

In October 2017, CNN reported the Umbrella Movement's return: Almost three years to the day after the 2014 Umbrella Movement shut down parts of Hong Kong, thousands of people once again took to the streets. As the city's government marked the 68th anniversary of the People's Republic of China, protesters wearing black braved stifling heat and pouring rain to call for the release of "political prisoners" jailed last month, including Umbrella leaders Joshua Wong, Nathan Law and Alex Chow. Those arrests marked a turnaround from 2014, when the trio helped bring out hundreds of thousands of people to the streets to call for a more direct form of democracy in the former British colony.

Tags: · · · · · · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · sound art · political art

Art of the Everyday

July 9th, 2018 · Comments

 

What happens outside the art scene inspires many of today’s curators, filmmakers and artists. They mine the conceptual depth of personal and communal rituals and routines. Community gardens, shared ride systems, public processionals, weathervanes, home improvement projects, live streaming radio and selfies on the internet are just a few of the subjects and sites of their research, commentary and engagement. Projects that elevate our view of the everyday reveal life as an art form—translating the mundane into the extraordinary.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Audio: Camionnette Chérie,  original sound by Claudette et Ti Pièrre; TET CHAJE, mix by Michelange Quay; David Walters, Mesi Bondye; Yosvany Terry, Conga Reversible

Related Episodes:

Marcus Gammel (2107), Skulptur Projekte Münster 2017, Sounds of Miami Art Week (2016), New Performance Art (2016), Cesar Cornejo (2015), Jllian Mayer (2014)

Related Links:

Giscard Bouchotte 

Tap-Tap Chéri  

Sculptors of Grand Rue, Haiti 

Ghetto Biennale 

Jeremy Deller 

Jeremy Deller, Skulptur Projekte Münster 2007/2017 

Cesar Cornejo 

rootoftwo

Whithervanes 

EN MAS’

Tide by Side 

Clair Tancons

documenta 14 Public Radio

Jillian Mayer

400 Nudes

Tags: · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · sound art · public art · performance art · curator · black culture · environment · performance · community · political art · exhibition

Where Art Meets Activism

June 25th, 2018 · Comments

Activism has long been a way for artists and curators, writers and filmmakers to engage with global flashpoints, inspiring new perspectives on visible and unseen causes. Over the last century, public interventions, performative protests, and works created for public marches and events have led communities to participate in art experiences and make art themselves.

The Me Too Movement, Black Lives Matter, Dreamers and Climate Change Activists expose sexual harassment and assault, race-based violence, immigrant rights violations, and the impact of sea level rise. The issues have energized today’s culture production. Contemporary artists and curators increasingly lead and invite calls to action in response to these vital concerns.

Voices in this conversation: Andrea Bowers, Ralph Rugoff, Catherine Morris, Gary Carrion-Murayari, Manolis D. Lemos, Tania Bruguera, Maria Elena Ortiz, Maria Alyokina

Sound Editor: Julien Borrelli | Special Audio: Andrea Bowers, Manolis D. Lemos, Pussy Riot | Photography: Credits in captions

Related episodes: Andrea Bowers on Environmental ActivismRalph Rugoff on the 13th Lyon BiennialCatherine Morris and A Year Of YesTania Bruguera on Art ActivismMaria Aloykhina on Political Art

Related links: Agora, The Highline, New YorkElizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminism Art, Brooklyn MuseumSongs for Sabotage, New MuseumSala de Arte Público Siquieros

Tags: · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · public art · activism · performance art · curator · environment · feminism · community · distance learning · political art · feminist art · exhibition

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