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Entries Tagged as 'black art'

The Mind-Bending Mythology of Trenton Doyle Hancock

November 12th, 2019 · Comments

In November 2019, Houston-based artist Trenton Doyle Hancock brings his mythological “Moundverse” to Miami. Locust Projects gives over the entire space to his site-specific installation. The artist will immerse us in a world inspired by comic books, toys, horror films and animations.

For decades, Hancock has been telling the story of the Mounds (gentle hybrid plant-like creatures) protected by Torpedo Boy (Hancock’s alter ego), and their enemies, the Vegans (mutants who consume tofu and spill Mound blood every chance they get). In paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, video and installation, the artist explores good and evil, authority, race and class, moral relativism, politics and religion.

This is not our first encounter with Trenton Doyle Hancock. He was among artists that curator Valerie Cassel Oliver selected for Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art. The exhibition premiered in 2013 at the Museum of Contemporary Arts, Houston, and traveled across the United States. In Radical Presence, Cassel Oliver surveyed seminal black performance art. She invited artists into the exhibition to re-stage their performances.

We make our way to Houston to watch Hancock embody one of the characters in the narrative he began creating when he was 10 years old. For an evening performance titled “Devotion,” he becomes a singing Mound. He's massive. He's blindfolded. Cassel Oliver feeds him Jell-O. The spectacle is intimate, absurd and deeply spiritual.

The next morning, we wander through the artist’s mind. Our conversation explores the histories, objects and ideas that inform his work. His warehouse is awash in accumulating materials—cast-off toys, books and bottle caps, scraps of felt and fabric, cans of paint. Works in progress and finished collage paintings line the walls. A drum kit sits waiting in one corner. It seems unlikely that this artist will ever lose the desire to experiment and play with the fantastical characters that animate his inner world. 

Sound Editor: 2019 Anamnesis Audio; 2013 Eric Schwartz | Special Audio: Trenton Doyle Hancock

Related Episodes: Valerie Cassel Oliver on Black Performance in Contemporary Art, Tameka Norris on Channeling Personal History, William Pope.L Transforms the Black Factory into a Magic Lantern Show

Related Links: Locust Projects, Trenton Doyle Hancock at MASS MoCA, Radical Presence: Contemporary Black Performance Art

Tags: contemporary art · Miami · identity · Artist · black masculinity · black art · comic book · podcast · figurative painting · art podcast · exhibition

Art and Film Illuminate The Black Imagination

August 5th, 2019 · Comments

How do contemporary art and film illuminate the Black Imagination? This segment from our archive explores some of the issues and ideas behind creative practices that re-imagine the Black experience.

To begin, we share a conversation recorded with curator Valerie Cassel Oliver from 2013, while she was working at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. Cassel Oliver is now Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, where she's expanding the representation of African American and African-diasporic artists in the Museum's collection.

On November 2, 2016, artists, filmmakers and curators joined us to consider this topic during the Fresh Art International show on Jolt Radio, Miami. Since then, curator Natalia Zuluaga continues to edit [NAME] publications and co-edits the bilingual online journal Dispatches. In summer 2019, Zuluaga curates Materia Abierta, a program on theory, art and technology in Mexico City. Artist Domingo Castillo has been working under the radar since visualizing the complexities of Miami’s future in his 2017 video Tropical Malaise. In 2019, among other recent projects, artist Jamilah Sabur presented a five channel video installation at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, and showed a commissioned video at Hudson Yards, New York. Amir George, co-founder of the touring visual shorts program Black Radical Imagination, continues to engage in cinema culture. Mikhaile Solomon, founding director of the annual PRIZM art fair, is preparing for the Fair’s seventh year in Miami, scheduled for December 2019.

Sound Editor: Guney Ozsan 2016; Anamnesis Audio 2019 | Special Audio: courtesy Jamilah Sabur and Oolite Arts

Related Episodes: Valerie Cassel Oliver on Black Performance in Contemporary Art and Jean-Ulrick Désert and Trenton Doyle Hancock on Radical Presence, Black in America, Contemporary Black Portraiture

Related Links: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, [NAME] Publications, Hammer Museum, Black Radical Imagination, PRIZM Art Fair, Oolite Arts

 

Tags: Fresh Talk · contemporary art · film · black culture · black art · art podcast

Charles Gaines on Philosophy and Politics in Conceptual Art

July 29th, 2019 · Comments

American artist Charles Gaines has been delving into philosophy, abstraction and mathematics to address politics and race since the 1970s. In August 2019, Gaines receives the 60th Annual Edward MacDowell Medal, an award celebrating his high achievements in visual art, musical composition and performance, and his influence as a teacher, writer and curator. An artist whose work is described as formulating the DNA of the conceptual movement, Gaines is a key figure in contemporary art history.

Born in Charleston, South Carolina, Gaines was the first African American accepted into the School of Art and Design MFA program at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He now lives and works in Los Angeles. He’s been a faculty member at the California Institute of the Arts, for more than three decades.

As Charles Gaines prepares for high profile exhibitions in Los Angeles, San Francisco and London, through 2022, we reflect on what his art says to the world. Resolutely abstract in his practice, Charles Gaines refuses traditional representation—resisting both dominant racial stereotypes, and pressure from within the black community. His gridworks and manifestos deliberately counter deep-seated assumptions about the forms that nature and culture, art and music should take. Gaines shows us how art can embody conceptual, aesthetic, and personal freedom.

This episode features conversations recorded with Charles Gaines in 2015, 2017 and 2019.

About the MacDowell Medal: A Haven for Artists since 1907, the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire, was the first artist residency program established in the United States. Each year, the MacDowell Medal recognizes one individual for outstanding contributions to American arts and culture. Merce Cunningham, Louise Nevelson, Isamu Noguchi, Sonny Rollins, and Toni Morrison are among past honorees.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Audio: Charles Gaines, Manifestos performance, 56th Venice Art Biennale

Related Episodes: Mark Bradford Connects Art with the Real WorldContemporary Art and the Black Imagination

Related Links: Charles Gaines | MacDowell Honors Visual Artist‎Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida CollectionCharles Gaines, Institute of Contemporary Art, MiamiCharles Gaines, The Studio Museum in HarlemBiennale Arte 2015, All the World's Futures

Tags: Fresh Talk · black art · political art · art podcast

Curating and Creative Resilience with IKT in Miami

June 17th, 2019 · Comments

What does "creative resilience" mean for curators in the year 2019? 

One evening, we decide to find out. Setting up a temporary recording studio in a poolside cabana, at a Miami Beach hotel, we sit down with a dozen curators and cultural producers to document their stories. In this marathon recording session, you’ll hear curatorial strategies for engaging new communities, increasing the visibility of underrepresented artists, and addressing some of today's most pressing social, political and environmental challenges.

We recorded this special program when the annual Congress of the Association of International Curators of Contemporary Art (IKT) took place in the United States for the first time. Curators from the U.S., Europe and the Caribbean gathered in Miami, Florida, to explore the contemporary art scene and participate in a symposium about art and resilience in the climate crisis.

Voices in the episode: (alpha order) Eva Asp, Bayardo Blandino, Aldeide Delgado, Yucef Merhi, Thale Fastvold and Tanja Torjussen, Michele Fiedler, O'Neil Lawrence, Lorie Mertes, Najja Moon, Marina Reyes Franco, Sofía Shaula Reeser-del Rio

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Audio: (in order of appearance) Spectres in Change: FoAM / Maja Kuzmanovic and Nik Gaffney; The Quilt Performing Arts Group for Beyond Fashion exhibition, National Gallery of Jamaica; Contemporary Art Museum of Caracas (Hacked!) 2000-2004; The BLCK Family Dinner

Related Episodes: Art and the Climate Crisis with IKT MiamiArt and the Rising SeaCurating in a Time of Global Change: IKT NorwaySounds of Contemporary Art in Norway with IKT

 

Related Links: International Association of Curators of Contemporary ArtFoAM Spectres in ChangeSala de Arte Público SiqueirosContemporary Art Museum of Caracas (Hacked!) 2000-2004National Gallery of JamaicaResisting ParadiseLocust ProjectsThe BLCK FamilyGävle KonstcentrumInternational Cities of Refuge NetworkSALA MAC / Contemporary Visual Arts Center of Women in the Arts in HondurasWomen Photographers International ArchiveLocus Art

Tags: contemporary art · Miami · photography · activism · Artist · curator · black art · environment · art podcast

Art Historian Playlist: Deborah Barkun Listens to Joana Choumali

May 13th, 2019 · Comments

Today’s conversation continues our Playlist series. We’re inviting artists, curators, architects, writers, filmmakers, cultural producers and other listeners to introduce episodes from our archive.

Based in the United States, art historian and curator Deborah Barkun is Chair of the Department of Art and Art History and Director of Museum Studies at Ursinus College, outside Philadelphia. Her research centers on the social dynamics of artistic collaboration. Barkun is contributing to our stories from the 58th Venice Art Biennale. Here, she introduces our conversation with Ivorian artist Joana Choumali, first released on April 30, 2018.

Deborah Barkun writes: I am excited to introduce this reprise of “Joana Choumali Embroiders Empathy.” I feel especially connected to this episode, as I was present for Cathy’s first interview with Choumali in the Ivory Coast Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale. Choumali spoke poignantly about African emigration and the emptiness it leaves in the hearts of loved ones left behind. Her hand-embroidered and collaged photographic diptychs depict this global migration. Loose threads left dangling from the works speak to a sense of ongoing longing.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Photography: Deborah Barkun

Related Episodes: Joana Choumali Embroiders EmpathySounds of the 57th Venice Art BiennaleSamson Young: Songs for Disaster ReliefLisa Reihana on Reversing the Colonial GazeMonument to Decay: Israeli Pavilion in VeniceMark Bradford Connects Art with the Real World

Related Links: Joana ChoumaliIvory Coast PavilionVenice Art BiennaleDak’Art 2018

Tags: contemporary art · art biennial · Africa · identity · international biennial · Artist · black culture · black art · podcast · installation · political art · art podcast · biennial · history · art fair · venice · venice art biennale · exhibition

Creative Time Summit 2018 to Explore Miami Culture

October 22nd, 2018 · Comments

Creative Time, the force behind ambitious public art projects in New York City and beyond, takes its annual summit to Miami in 2018. We invite Creative Time director Justine Ludwig to talk about the focus of this year's convening.

On Archipelagos and Other Imaginaries—Collective Strategies to Inhabit the World is the poetic title and subject of the 2018 Summit, with the idea of coalition as a central theme. Thinkers, dreamers and doers working at the intersection of art and politics gather to consider issues ranging from immigration and borders to climate realities, notions of intersectional justice, gentrification and tourism as an enabler for neocolonialism.

A portal to the Caribbean, Latin America and the entire world, Miami is the perfect context for such conversations. The City's creative community is ready—not only to share local challenges and their own site-sensitive initiatives, but also to welcome fresh perspectives on how art and activism might address these global concerns.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Audio: Krudas Cubensi, Mi cuerpo es mio, Haus of Shame via Amal KioskBrigada Puerta de TierraNástio Mosquito, Hilário

Related Episodes: Cultural Complexity in Little HaitiArt and the Rising SeaThe BLCK Family of MiamiModern Portrait of Black FloridaDiaspora Vibe: Art with Caribbean RootsCaribbean Arts Remix MiamiTania Bruguera on Art ActivismCesar Cornejo on Architectural InterventionMary Mattingly on Human RelationshipsGlexis Novoa on Cuba's PastLive from Dominican Republic with Tilting AxisLive from Trinidad: Where Digital Culture ThrivesPublic Art and the UnderlineArtist Residency in the EvergladesArt and the Environment at Deering Estates

Related Links: Creative TimeCreative Time Summit 2018Miami-Dade County Art in Public PlacesJohn S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Creative Time Summit Miami is co-presented with Art in Public Places of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, with leading support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Tags: · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · Miami · film · public art · identity · activism · performance art · Artist · invisible communities · project · curator · black culture · black art · podcast · writer · community · drag · political art · political performance art · environmental installation · art podcast · history · women's rights

Black in America

September 3rd, 2018 · Comments

What does it mean to be Black in 21st century America? The expression of Blackness in art has a history of intricate connections to civil rights and social movements. In the United States and abroad, painting and drawing, filmmaking and photography, performance and protest have long represented diverse creative perspectives on the volatile subject of race and identity in this country.

Today, we hear from curators and artists whose work directly engages with race and American identity. Individually and collectively, they generate “freestyle” expressions of Blackness—revealing that no matter how history influences the Black cultural space, identity remains a fluid form in the hands of contemporary artists.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Photos courtesy of featured artists and the Renaissance Society

Featured Audio: Thelma Golden at Crystal Bridges Museum of American ArtHamza Walker, Black Is, Black Ain't Symposium, Renaissance SocietyJohanne Rahaman field recordings in South FloridaTheaster Gates at Katzen Arts Center, American UniversityTheaster Gates performs at Huguenot House in Kassel, Germany, for documenta 13Sanford Biggers, BAM (For Michael)Fahamu Pecou, All that Glitters Ain't GoalsAmy Sherald at Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago 

Related Episodes: Modern Black Portrait of FloridaJefferson Pinder on Symbols of Power and StruggleTheaster Gates on Meaning, Making and ReconciliationSanford Biggers on Time and the Human ConditionAmy Sherald on New Racial NarrativesFahamu Pecou on Art x Hip-Hop

Related links: Thelma GoldenStudio Museum of HarlemFreestyleHamza WalkerBlack Is, Black Ain'tJohanne RahamanJefferson PinderTheaster GatesSanford BiggersAmy SheraldFahamu PecouDeborah Roberts

Tags: · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · public art · identity · activism · performance art · Artist · curator · Theaster Gates · black culture · black masculinity · black art · podcast · community · music · Chicago · political art · political performance art · art podcast · exhibition

The BLCK Family of Miami on Collective Creativity

August 13th, 2018 · Comments

The BLCK Family, a Miami-based creative collective, fosters opportunities for individual artists to share their original music and poetry in intimate settings. They organize roving cultural experiences that range from occasional 'family dinners' to the monthly performance events they call Freedom Sessions. Motivated by the desire to connect communities, The BLCK Family manifesto is to encourage collaboration, foster creativity and manifest love—giving artists the chance to use sound to set themselves free.
 
Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special Audio: James Klynn, Frankie Midnight, Va, Inez Barlatier | Photography by Passion Ward and video documentation by Rashaud Michel courtesy The BLCK Family
 
Related Episodes: Borscht Film Festival, Buskerfest Miami, Miami's Caribbean Arts Remix Related Links: The BLCK Family, Najja Moon, James Klynn, Inez Barlatier, Frankie Midnight Freedom Session, Vá Freedom Session

Tags: · Fresh Talk · Miami · black culture · black art · performance · community · music · art podcast · spoken word · Borscht Film Festival

Art Sparking Social Engagement

May 28th, 2018 · Comments

Curators and artists whose passion is social engagement share their experiments in relational aesthetics—participatory performances, interactive installations, community events, and inside/outside exhibitions—invite viewers to become co-creators, to take ownership in the creative process.

Curators Jochen Volz (São Paulo Biennial, Live Uncertainty, 2016), Susan Cross (Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, Material World, 2010-2011, The Workers, 2011-2012), James Voorhies (Bureau of Open Culture, MASS MoCA, The Workers) and Stephanie Smith (SMART Museum of Art, FEAST, 2012, and Institute for Contemporary Art, Richmond, Declaration, 2018) share their perspectives, as do artists William Pope.L (Baile, 2016), Theaster Gates (Soul Food Pavilion, 2012) and Marinella Senatore (Estman Radio, ongoing).

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio

Special Audio:

William Pope.L, Baile, São Paulo Biennial
There Is Only Light (We Do Not Know What To Do With Other Worlds) performance-reading, July 2011, MASS MoCA. Produced by Bureau for Open Culture
Theaster Gates, FEAST, SMART Museum of Art, University of Chicago
Marinella Senatore and Estman Radio recording, courtesy Marinella Senatore and Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Contemporary Art

Related Links:

Live UncertaintyMaterial WorldThe Workers: Precarity/Invisibility/Mobility, FEAST: Radical Hospitality in Contemporary ArtDeclarationEmily Hall Tremaine Foundation Exhibition AwardExhibitions on the Cusp

Tags: Fresh Talk · contemporary art · identity · activism · performance art · invisible communities · project · curator · Theaster Gates · black art · podcast · installation · performance · museum · community · Change · political art · architecture · architectural intervention · political performance art · art podcast · sao paulo biennial · history · exhibition · Live Radio

Live from Dakar 2018-Jolt Radio-16May2018

May 21st, 2018 · Comments

Today, we bring you Fresh Art International LIVE from Dakar, Senegal. We made the journey to West Africa in May 2018, to capture sounds of local art and culture and to document our first encounter with the biennial of contemporary African art known as Dak'Art.

In the first of our two live streaming broadcasts, you'll hear Marisol Rodríguez (Mexico City/Paris), one of the biennial's guest curators, talk about her work with a team of creatives based in the Hurricane Zone (Mexico's Yucatàn Peninsula, Central America and the Caribbean).

Also LIVE: our show from la Boite à Idée, or Idea Box, a cultural hub in Dakar's Mermoz district. In the garden of this space is where cultural activist Ken Aicha Sy, founder of Wakh'Art Music introduces us to a few of the creatives engaging in the local art and music scene. You'll hear from Ms. Sy, along with Franco-Senegalese artist Gabriel Dia, jazz guitarist Paride Pagnotti, I Science vocalist Corinna Fiore, and composer Nathan Fallou Fuhr. A modest local songwriter introducing himself simply as "Jean-Pierre," steps up to the microphone with his guitar to voice our melodic good-bye-for-now.

Sound Editor: Anamnesis Audio | Special audio courtesy ZAM ZAM, Paride PagnottiI ScienceNathan Fallou Fuhr and Jean-Pierre 

Tags: · Fresh Talk · contemporary art · art biennial · Africa · artist residency · international biennial · Artist · curator · Mexico · black culture · black art · podcast · community · international art fair · music · political art · art podcast · biennial · history · exhibition · Live Radio